Racist Radio

As Dena Jensen reports, William Honea, Skagit County senior deputy prosecuting attorney –in justifying the CERA anti-Indian workshop in Mount Vernon on May 20–falsely attributed an incendiary quote to Swinomish tribal chairman Brian Cladoosby. Given that Mr. Honea–like CERA celebrity Elaine Willman–was given a platform on KGMI radio to promote racist resentment, it is perhaps a good time for human rights activists and moral authorities to pursue having Saturday Morning Live removed from its programming. After four years of hosting anti-Indian racists on her show, it’s time for KGMI to pull the plug on Tea Party leader Kris Halterman.

Racist Revival

As reported at Noisy Waters Northwest, CERA–the “Ku Klux Klan of Indian country”–made an appearance in Skagit County yesterday, four years after the CERA anti-Indian conference in Whatcom County. The 2013 CERA gathering targeted Lummi Nation, while the 2017 workshop targeted Swinomish Tribal Community.

The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians–Lummi and Swinomish included–oppose fossil fuel export on the Salish Sea, providing an opportunity for promoters of interracial discord to cash in on the carbon corridor conflict.

Read more on the anti-Indian movement revival in the Salish Sea region here.

The Terminators

As the Indian Law and Policy Center reports, termination of Indian tribes as sovereign political entities is endemic in the current presidential administration. Taken as a whole, the agenda of key cabinet appointees and advisors is to finalize assimilation of tribes into the American system of corporate institutional dominance.

In essence, this agenda’s goal is the de facto abrogation of treaties made between tribes and the United States. Indeed, remarks made by Interior Secretary Zinke come right out of the CERA Anti-Indian playbook.

Peace and Power

The Day the 60s Died, a PBS documentary about “the turbulent spring of 1970,” recounts the Kent State and Jackson State massacres of anti-war college students by the Ohio National Guard and the Mississippi State Police.

In 1970, the year I graduated from high school, the anti-war movement in the United States was practically all we talked about. Reading former Washington Post reporter Betty Medsger’s book The Burglary, I am reminded of what a crazy time it was.

In March 1970, California governor Ronald Reagan called for a bloodbath to silence anti-war protestors.

In April 1970, President Nixon announced the massive bombing of Vietnam would be expanded to Cambodia.

In May 1970, Ohio governor James Rhodes declared martial law at Kent State University, resulting in four students killed and nine injured by National Guard gunfire as students assembled in peaceful protest. Ten days after the Kent State massacre, local and state police in Mississippi fired 460 rounds at a student dormitory on the Jackson State University campus, killing two, wounding twelve.

The Friday after the Kent State shootings, as they sang at a peaceful noon vigil called for by Mayor John Lindsay to honor the slain Kent State students, scores of students in New York City were bludgeoned with crow bars by construction workers. Twenty-two of the workers who beat the students were honored weeks later by President Nixon at the White House.

The revolutionary 1960s were challenging for us as American teenagers, and bewildering for our parents. Feminism, racial equality, and rejection of religion set us apart from their generation. Social phenomena that unfolded during my high school years alone (1967–70) were astounding:

Resistance Nonsense

The term resistance is being misused.

Marching and protesting — aka moral sanction — is fine, but technically it is not resistance. Resistance is warfare, i.e. boycotts, strikes, sabotage, armed insurrection.

Dispersing political power — now concentrated in the financial elite — was Bernie’s message, and we need to keep working on that. Dissent without resistance is a form of consent.